Archive | November, 2012

Porch Swing

30 Nov

We were in Lowes today and saw a stack of these swings and thought that would be nice for the back porch, so we picked up one in a box to take home.

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I opened the box to read the instructions first (as I always do) and check the pieces.

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Each piece in the box was individually wrapped.

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The nuts and bolts were pressure sealed onto this piece of cardboard. They even included the necessary wrenches and a small bottle of touchup paint. The directions said it would take two people two hours to put it together, and sure enough it took two hours exactly. The only complaints I had were the parts were not actually labeled with a sticker on the parts as they were in the instructions.

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And on this one leg the hole was drilled too close to the end. The hole on the left was 5/8ths of an inch down, the one on the right was 3/8ths of an inch down. In the end, it worked out ok. I just had to trim the end cap a little so it would go down into the leg.

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Now we can relax on the back porch and just be a-swingin’.

Construction Update 47

29 Nov

The crew that put the granite counter tops in the kitchen put the same granite around the fireplace.

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I built a nice little fire this morning while the contractor was installing the wood floors upstairs. I wanted to check out the fireplace to be sure it was working correctly while the contractor was still working at the house. Everything worked perfectly!

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The tile man is putting the tile around the bath tub in the master bath. He is using this wet saw to cut the tiles. It is going to take him a lot of time because he is a perfectionist, but it is going to be so worth it. More to come.

Drainage Problem Solved

28 Nov

I have never liked gutters on a house because of the problems with the rot they cause from being stopped up and overflowing or just otherwise leaking. But this house has a steep roof and all the water on the front side drains off at these two points on each side of the porch.

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That is a lot of water concentrated into a small area so I needed to do something about the runoff to move it away from the house.

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I bought two of these drain catchers to bury in the ground to catch the runoff from the roof. This is a 2 foot heavy-duty plastic box with knockouts to attach drain pipes.

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We placed one on each side of the porch and attached flexible pipe to drain the water down the hill.

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After the pipe was attached, we put plastic groundcover down to help control erosion. We are going to put rocks around the grate and some sort of large bark mulch over the plastic.

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As for now, the pipes are running down the hill into a ditch. In the future I could place a large tank at the base of the hill and run the pipes into the tank for a secondary source of  (free) water. Hummm, just thinking.

Safety First

27 Nov

Some of you remember I recently over-inflated a small tire that exploded apart and hit my hand. Well, the doctor said no serious damage was done, but the tip of my thumb and the knuckle of my index finger still hurt, so that is a reminder to be safety aware.

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So, keeping with that theme, I replaced the inflatable tires on the small dolly with these solid rubber tires. They cost the same as the inflatable tires, plus they never go flat. I don’t know why they didn’t put these tires on the dolly in the first place! Be Safe!

Tuesday Tunes; Judy Garland, Somewhere over the Rainbow

27 Nov

From Judy’s final live performance in 1969.

 

Newest Follower

27 Nov

I would like to welcome my newest follower Shannon. Shannon is an aspiring taxidermist from Great Britton of all places. Pip-Pip! Welcome to my blog, feel free to comment or ask questions anytime, and thanks for hitting that follow button!

Safe Room Complete

26 Nov

Some of you will remember the master bedroom, bathroom, and closet are built with concrete walls and ceilings to be tornado proof. We formed the walls with the insulated Styrofoam forms and poured the concrete in the middle.

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The walls are over 12 inches wide, with 6 inches of that being concrete and 6 inches being Styrofoam.

You might remember how ugly and industrial the doors looked at first, but now with decorative molding and a little paint they look much nicer.

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The doors are made of heavy-duty steel with triple hinges and triple dead-bolt locks with a steel frame set into the concrete. This door has a full length mirror for Sweet Thing, I myself have no interest in seeing myself in a full length mirror, from the neck up is plenty.Nerd smile

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Due to the building codes, all bedrooms must have an exit to the outside either through a door or a large window. Sweet Thing said an outside door in the bedroom made her feel uncomfortable and she would not be able to sleep there. So a window it is. That sort of defeated the idea of being a safe room so we had these wrought iron shutters made for the inside of the window. It has a crossbar in the middle but it can still be opened with one motion, per the code. That not only keeps the room storm proof but keeps it intruder safe as well.

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Each shutter has 3 hinges attached with J-bolts set into the concrete wall. That should stop just about anything. I guess if an F-5 tornado picked up a piece of granite the size of a beach ball and hurled it directly into the shutters it might come through, but if there is a tornado outside I won’t be standing in front of the window, I’ll be hunkered down in the shower for ultimate protection. Getting closer!